Divorce for irremediable disunity

 

Divorce for irremediable disunity is a little more procedurally complicated than divorce by mutual consent, but can be just as quick.

 

 

Divorce for irremediable disunity can be obtained in several ways: either by proving that the continuation of the common life is objectively no longer possible because of the behavior of one or the parties, or by the passage of time, or by the repetition twice in court of the will to divorce.

 

When the request for divorce is made by only one of the spouses, it will be necessary to demonstrate a behavior making it impossible to continue living together or at least one year of de facto separation or to repeat the request twice with one year interval.

 

When the request is made jointly by both spouses, it will take at least six months of de facto separation or repeat the request twice with at least 3 months apart.

 

After a first interview, Me Decortis will tell you if the first hypothesis, namely a fact making the continuation of the common life impossible (for example an adultery) is possible or if it is preferable to opt for the second, namely the flow of time.

 

For a list of the documents required for a divorce for irremediable disunity, see here.